ITHACA, N.Y.—The Cornell Cinema has announced its screening calendar for the upcoming spring semester.


Spring 2022 Events Release 

Virtual offerings: Jan 26 – Feb 6 

In-person offerings: Feb 7 – May 5 

Guidelines for in-person screenings:  

All patrons must adhere to Cornell’s public health requirements for events which include wearing high-quality (N95 or  equivalent) masks while indoors, and, if a patron does not have a current Cornell ID, provide proof of vaccination or a  recent negative COVID-19 test. Up-to-date guidance, including acceptable proof of vaccination or test, is available  at covid.cornell.edu/events Given the mask mandate, food and beverages will not be allowed in the theatre, and the  concession stand will be closed until further notice. 

Ticket Prices:  

$9.50 general admission/$7.50 seniors/ 

$7 students/$5.50 CU graduate students and kids 12 & under 

$7 general/$5.50 students for matinees (before 6:00pm) 

$6 ($4.50 + $1.50 fee) virtual cinema 

Special event prices may apply 

All patrons are strongly encouraged to purchase tickets online in advance.  

Digital All-Access Pass!  

For one incredibly low price each semester, patrons are admitted to all regularly priced in-person and virtual  

screenings; discounted tickets available for specially-priced events.  

That’s over 75 films each semester!  

Passes can be purchased online only at cinema.cornell.edu. 

Pricing for the All-Access Pass:  

CU graduate & professional students – $10 

All other students – $20 

Community members (including faculty & staff) – $30 

Once purchased, patrons should reserve their “free” tickets for the shows they would like to attend. By so doing, they  can proceed directly to the usher and skip the box office line. 

All screenings in Willard Straight Theatre as of February 7 

(pending Cornell approval) 

Many films will feature faculty or graduate student introductions 

For more information visit http://cinema.cornell.edu 

Virtual Screenings Kick-off the Spring ’22 Season  

Jan 26 – Feb 6 

Featuring a virtual introduction to The Olive Trees of Justice  

by former Cornell Cinema director Richard Herskowitz

Cornell Cinema launches its Spring ’22 schedule with four exquisite foreign language films offered on demand via its  virtual cinema platform from January 26 – February 6 to coincide with Cornell’s remote teaching schedule for the first  two weeks of the semester. A thrilling schedule of in-person screenings & events will begin on Monday, February 7 in  Willard Straight Theatre when teaching is scheduled to return to the classroom. A highlight of the virtual line-up is  American documentarian James Blue’s sole narrative feature, The Olive Trees of Justice (1962), shot in Algiers during  the Algerian War (the only film production to do so), shown in a new digital restoration that just premiered at the  Museum of Modern Art in New York as part of its “To Save and Project” series. Former Cornell Cinema director Richard  Herskowitz has provided an introduction for the film, which will run in front of the film. Herskowitz has been involved  with the James Blue Project for the past ten years and was involved with the film’s restoration. The virtual line-up  includes another mid-century classic, Fellini’s fairy tale road movie La Strada (1954), which kicks off a Fellini, Masina &  Rota series. It will be offered in a recent digital restoration, as will Taiwanese director Hou Hsiao- hsien’s  atmospheric Flowers of Shanghai (1998), adapted from a nineteenth-century novel and set amidst the world of  courtesans. Also on offer: the virtual Ithaca premiere of Ryûsuke (Drive My Car) Hamaguchi’s other acclaimed film from  2021, Wheel of Fortune and Fantasy, a triptych of short stories inspired by life’s tiny miracles, bound together by  memory, regret, deception, and fate. Virtual screenings are included with the purchase of a Spring ’22 All-Access Pass.  Single tickets are $6. 

The Olive Trees of Justice (1962) Jan 26 – Feb 6 

Directed by James Blue 

w/pre-recorded intro by Richard Herskowitz  

La Strada (1954) Jan 26 – Feb 6 

Directed by Federico Fellini 

Flowers of Shanghai (1998) Jan 26 – Feb 6 

Directed by Hou Hsiao-hsien 

Wheel of Fortune and Fantasy (2021) Jan 26 – Feb 6  Directed by Ryûsuke Hamaguchi 

Fellini, Masina & Rota – The Early Years 

In 1942, Federico Fellini, who had been making a living as a cartoonist and humorist, found a gig as a radio scripter,  where he met a young actress, Guiletta Masina. They were married the following year. The great neorealist director  Roberto Rossellini recruited him as a co-scriptwriter for Rome, Open City in 1945, for which Fellini was nominated for  an Academy Award. 2020 marked the centennial of the great showman’s birth, but celebrations had to be postponed  due to COVID. Cornell Cinema is thrilled to present four of Fellini’s first five solo ventures as a director; the films all  feature Masina, the two greatest as his muse (La Strada and Nights of Cabiria). These films mix neorealism with an  already playful turn to fantasy, propelled even further by the beautiful Nino Rota scores, which mix the carnivalesque,  jazz, vaudeville, and romance. There is also a strong influence of silent films, especially in the Chaplinesque clowning of  Masina. All of the films are being offered in recent or brand new digital restorations. 

La Strada (1954) Jan 26 – Feb 6  

Directed by Federico Fellini 

Screening via Cornell Cinema’s Virtual Cinema 

The White Sheik (1952) Feb 7 

Directed by Federico Fellini 

Il Bidone (1955) Feb 10, 13 Directed by Federico Fellini 

Nights of Cabiria (1957) Mar 4, 5 Directed by Federico Fellini 

Experimental Landscapes  

Featuring 5 Ithaca premieres and several introductions by Patricia Keller (Comp Lit/Romance Studies)   

How does place shape our understanding of the world and of ourselves in it? How might audiovisual explorations of  landscape—ones that move away from treating place as a mere backdrop to narrative and instead harness its potential  as a dynamic, multilayered archive of histories, memories, and dreams—offer us new perspectives on the poetics of  experience? This series brings together a range of films, from ethnographic meditation to non-fiction documentary to  fictional drama, that frame the phenomenological affinities between place and experience and foreground the  connection between formal experimentation and the haptic, sensorial power of cinema. Situated between rural and  urban atmospheres, these works draw on sound, duration and textures to highlight underlying tensions between decay  and overgrowth, ruin and resilience, overdevelopment and underexposure. The landscapes featured in these films are  often quiet and subtle yet notably charged with a sense of something uncanny, something hidden in plain sight. 

The series forms part of a new course called “Ruined Landscapes & the Visual Archive” (COML 3486 / SPAN 3940) taught  by Patricia Keller, who will introduce several of the films. Cosponsored with the Departments of Romance Studies and  Comparative Literature, and the Summer Program in Madrid.  

L. Cohen (2018) Feb 7  

Directed by James Benning 

Sweetgrass (2010) Feb 8 

Directed by Lucien Castaing-Taylor and Ilisa Barbash 

Ratcatcher (2000) Feb 15 

Directed by Lynne Ramsay 

The Two Sights (2020) Feb 23 

w/filmmaker Josh Bonnetta in person 

Costa da Morte (2013) Mar 8 

Directed by Lois Patino 

Casa de Lava (1994) Mar 15 

Directed by Pedro Costa 

Nostalghia (1983) Mar 22  

Directed by Andrei Tarkovsky 

Homo Sapiens (2016) Mar 29 

Directed by Nikolaus Geyrhalter 

Still Life (2006) Apr 27 

Directed by Jia Zhangke 

Place and Time: The Landscape Films of Emily Richardson (2001-2018) May 4 

Directed by Emily Richardson 

Saturday Night Noir  

Night and the city. Dark alleys, rain-drenched streets, silhouettes at windows, blinking neon. Welcome to Saturday Night  Noir, a one-way trip into the doom-laden heart of a new kind of American cinema featuring life-beaten men and  dangerously seductive women, born of the expressionistic camera-work of German and Austrian emigres, and the pulp  imaginations of the great Hammett, Chandler, Cain and their siblings. We offer five greats from the U.S., one per year  from 1944–1948, four enrolled in the National Film Registry. And a bonus: two screenings of 1949’s great British noir,  The Third Man (moved from its original Saturday night slot to accommodate our revised February 7 opening for in 

person screenings!). Noir enthusiasts can finally see a restored print of Detour, in which “B auteur Edgar G. Ulmer turned  threadbare production values and seedy, low-rent atmosphere into indelible pulp poetry.” (Janus Films) The series wraps  with Wilder’s classic Double Indemnity, introduced by local author David Lehman. Copies of his new book The  Mysterious Romance of Murder: Crime, Detection, and the Spirit of Noir, published by Cornell University Press, will be  available for sale at the screening. 

The Third Man (1949) Feb 7, 8

Directed by Carol Reed 

Out of the Past (1947) Feb 19 

Directed by Jacques Tourneur 

The Big Clock (1948) Mar 12 

Directed by John Farrow 

Detour (1945) Mar 19 

Directed by Edward G. Ulmer 

The Big Sleep (1946) Apr 23 

Directed by Howard Hawks 

Double Indemnity (1944) May 5 

Directed by Billy Wilder 

Francophone Film Festival  

For the fourth consecutive year, Cornell Cinema teams up with the Department of Romance Studies to present a  Francophone Film Festival, made possible, in part, by an Albertine Cinémathèque (formerly Tournées) Festival grant.  The grant supports six films, chosen from the granting organization’s recommended titles, and includes three older  titles: a program of recently restored short documentaries by Alain Resnais, a restoration of the late American director  Melvin van Peebles’ The Story of a Three Day Pass, based on his own French language novel, and Claire Denis’ 35 Shots  of Rum. The remaining three titles supported by the grant are the recent films Slalom, Charlene Favier’s quietly  devastating drama of sexual abuse set amid an elite ski club, featuring a knock-out performance by Noée Abita as a  high school student who falls victim to her attentive coach, revealing the complicated ways abuse can work; Sebastien  Lifshitz’s moving documentary portrait of 7-year-old Sasha, a transgender girl who became aware of her gender  dysphoria in very early childhood; and French-Ivorian writer-director Philippe Lacôte’s magical realist Night of the Kings,  which takes place during one night in a notorious prison in the middle of the Ivorian forest ruled by its inmates. The  highly acclaimed film from Ivory Coast was shortlisted for Best International Feature Oscar in 2020. Cornell Cinema  expands the Festival to include two more films from French speaking African countries – Mahamat-Saleh Haroun’s  Lingui, the Sacred Bonds from Chad and Mati Diop’s Atlantics from Senegal (also in Wolof, Arabic & English) – as well  as virtual offerings of American documentarian James Blue’s sole narrative feature, The Olive Trees of Justice, shot in  Algiers during the Algerian War and shown in a new digital restoration that just premiered at the Museum of Modern  Art in New York as part of its “To Save and Project” series; a new 35mm print of Alain Resnais’ underseen Je t’aime, je  t’aime, a haunting tale of romantic obsession and time travel; and Ladj Ly’s Oscar-nominated Les Miserables (2019),  inspired by the 2005 riots in Paris. 

Albertine Cinémathèque is a program of FACE Foundation and Villa Albertine in partnership with the French Embassy  in the United States and with the support of the CNC (Centre National du Cinéma et de l’Image Animée) and the Fonds  Culturel Franco-Américain. 

The Olive Trees of Justice (1962) Jan 26 – Feb 6 

Directed by James Blue 

w/pre-recorded intro by Richard Herskowitz  

Screening via Cornell Cinema’s Virtual Cinema 

Early Shorts by Alain Resnais (1948-1956) Feb 9 

Directed by Alain Resnais 

Je t’aime, je t’aime (1968) Feb 9  

Directed by Alain Resnais 

The Story of a Three Day Pass (1967) Feb 16 

Directed by Melvin Van Peebles 

Lingui, the Sacred Bonds (2021) Feb 17, 20  Directed by Mahamat-Saleh Haroun 

Slalom (2020) Feb 23, 25  Directed by Charlene Favier 

Atlantics (2019) Mar 2  

Directed by Mati Diop 

Little Girl (2020) Mar 10

Directed by Sebastien Lifshitz 

35 Shots of Rum (2009) Mar 23 

Directed by Claire Denis 

Les Miserables (2019) Apr 13 

Directed by Ladj Ly 

Night of the Kings (2020) Apr 20 

Directed by Philippe Lacôte 

Satoshi Kon: The Illusionist 

Manga artist and animator Satoshi Kon died suddenly in 2010 at the age of 46, leaving behind a small but hugely  influential body of work. His films, known for their seamless blending of reality and fantasy, are some of the most  acclaimed anime outside of Studio Ghibli. According to Kon’s friend and colleague, Mamoru Hosoda (Mirai, Belle),  “Satoshi Kon expanded the possibilities of animation. He created animated films of equal power to live-action film.” On  the occasion of a new documentary about Kon’s life and work, Satoshi Kon: The Illusionist, Cornell Cinema presents his  three greatest films: directorial debut Perfect Blue, ode to filmmaking Millennium Actress, and his final feature film  Paprika. Cosponsored with the East Asia Program.  

Perfect Blue (1999) Feb 10, 12 Directed by Satoshi Kon 

Satoshi Kon: The Illusionist (2021) Feb 11 

Directed by Pascal-Alex Vincent 

Millennium Actress (2001) Feb 17 

Directed by Satoshi Kon 

Paprika (2007) Mar 17, 19 Directed by Satoshi Kon 

Sub-Saharan Cinema  

Sub-Sahara Africa. Black Africa. A region most of us are woefully under informed about. A huge land mass comprised  of 55 countries, with a population of over 1 billion, where over 1,000 languages are spoken, there are no overarching  characteristics of films from the region, but, both historically and culturally, there are major regional differences between  North African and Sub-Saharan cinemas. This series offers three recent acclaimed feature films from Chad, Senegal and  Ivory Coast; a visually ravishing documentary about the growth and harvesting of the khat plant in Ethiopia, Faya Dayi, one of the most celebrated non-fiction films of 2021; and a program of short films from Sudan made in the ‘70s & ‘80s  that shines a light on a forgotten chapter of film history. “Even now, in 2020, Africa remains the most cinematically  underrepresented continent (not counting Antarctica)” (Variety), but these films reveal the rich cinematic possibilities  of Sub-Saharan cinema, a full flowering of which we eagerly await. 

Cosponsored with the Institute for African Development. IAD will be arranging film introductions and panel discussions  to accompany several of the films. 

Lingui, the Sacred Bonds (2021) Feb 17, 20  Directed by Mahamat-Saleh Haroun 

Atlantics (2019) Mar 2  

Directed by Mati Diop 

Sudanese Film Group Shorts (1964-1989) Mar 7 – 17 

Directed by various 

Screening via Cornell Cinema’s Virtual Cinema 

Faya Dayi (2021) Mar 16 

w/pre-recorded Q & A with filmmaker Jessica Beshir 

Night of the Kings (2020) Apr 20 

Directed by Philippe Lacôte 

Guest Filmmakers  

Featuring 3 in-person & 2 virtual presentations 

Over Cornell Cinema’s 50+ year history, hundreds of filmmakers have visited to present their work and enrich the  viewing experience for patrons, but the pandemic made that impossible last year. Thanks to the magic of Zoom, though,  we still managed to engage several filmmakers in discussion about their work after it was made available via our virtual  screening program. This Spring we’ll offer a mix of both in-person and virtual filmmaker presentations, with the Zoom  discussions projected on the big screen. Two programs feature in-person visits by local filmmakers with international  reputations, Ithaca College professors & artists, Josh Bonnetta and Cathy Lee Crane. Bonnetta will present The Two  Sights (An Dà Shealladh) which explores the disappearing tradition of second sight in the Outer Hebrides of Scotland.  The film connects locals’ accounts of supernatural phenomena with striking 16mm images and a carefully curated sonic  montage of the physical and aural environment, creating an ethnographic marvel. Crane will be joined by filmmaker  and Cornell alum Jason Livingston ’94 for (X)-trACTION, a collaborative of four+ media artists whose work examines  the technical and common use of the term “extraction” but also investigates their positions as artists grappling with  making art in ways that: extract images, ideas, and stories from their subjects, both human and geographical. Artist,  filmmaker and educator Jessica Bardsley just joined the Dept of Performing & Media Arts to teach film studies. We’ll  welcome her with a program of her short films on March 23. We’ll do a Zoom Q & A with filmmaker Shatara Michelle  Ford on March 9 following a screening of their acclaimed debut feature, Test Pattern, which follows an interracial couple  whose relationship is put to the test after the woman is sexually assaulted. The film has been nominated for Independent  Spirit Awards for Best First Feature, Best First Screenplay and Best Female Lead (Brittany S. Hall). Ethiopian-Mexican  filmmaker Jessica Beshir’s documentary Faya Dayi is one of fifteen films shortlisted for Best Documentary Feature Oscar,  and Beshir will join us for a pre-recorded Q & A that will be projected after the screening of the film on March 16. The  immersive, dreamlike film explores the lives of people affected by khat, a stimulant leaf that is also Ethiopia’s most  lucrative cash crop. 

The Two Sights (2020) Feb 23 

w/filmmaker Josh Bonnetta in person 

(X)-trACTION (2021) Mar 7 

w/filmmakers Cathy Lee Crane & Jason Livingston ’94 in person 

Test Pattern (2021) Mar 9 

w/Zoom Q & A with filmmaker Shatara Michelle Ford 

Faya Dayi (2021) Mar 16 

w/pre-recorded Q & A with filmmaker Jessica Beshir 

Rocks, Stars, and Other Feelings (2007-2019) Mar 23 

w/filmmaker Jessica Bardsley (PMA) in person 

Live Projection Performances  

Featuring two more visiting filmmakers! 

One aspect that sets cinema viewing apart from watching movies at home is the collective durational experience, from  a room full of people all experiencing the same filmed moment at the same time. Add to that the unpredictable thrill  of live performance and you have a wholly unique, never-to-be-replicated cinema event! Cornell Cinema is thrilled to  present two such events this semester. 

Spanish filmmaker Luis Macias will perform a live projector performance, Your Eyes are Spectral Machines, on March 30  (rescheduled from March 2020). Incorporating both live manipulation of multiple 16mm projectors, as well as 35mm  slide projectors, Luis Macias is a self-stylized image recycler, and is a co-founder of Crater Lab, an independent film  laboratory in Barcelona. American filmmaker Roger Beebe is no stranger  

to cinematic re-appropriation and recycling, as his work since 2006 consists primarily of multiple-projector  performances and essayistic videos that explore the world of found images and the “found” landscapes of late  capitalism. His Films for 1 – 8 Projectors (April 14) will feature a series of 16mm multi-projector performances, including  the seven-projector showstopper Light of a Dying Star (2008/2011), as well as a sampling of recent essay videos,  presented as live-narrated documentaries. 

Cosponsored with the Cornell Council for the Arts. 

Your Eyes are Spectral Machines (2015/18) Mar 30 

w/live projection performance by filmmaker Luis Macias 

Roger Beebe’s Films for 1-8 Projectors (2020) Apr 14 

w/live projection performance by filmmaker Roger Beebe 

Contemporary World Cinema  

Featuring 6 Ithaca Premieres 

Cornell Cinema regularly premieres award-winning international films from the film festival circuit that otherwise  wouldn’t screen in Ithaca, and this Spring we offer seven Ithaca premieres (in addition to films in our Francophone and  Sub-Saharan Africa series) set in Japan (a melancholic triptych by the director of Drive My Car), a thriller set in Argentina  during the dirty war (Azor); a story of queerness and prison over three decades set in Germany (Great Freedom); and  films set in 1980s Romania (Uppercase Print), as well as modern Syria (Neighbours) and India (Pebbles). All of the films  have appeared on Best of 2021 lists by film critics; Great Freedom is one of fifteen titles shortlisted for Best International  Feature Oscar; and Pebbles is nominated for an Independent Spirit Award for Best International Feature. 

Wheel of Futune and Fantasy (2021) Jan 26 – Feb 6  

Directed by Ryusuke Hamaguchi 

Screening via Cornell Cinema’s Virtual Cinema 

Azor (2021) Feb 25, 26  Directed by Andreas Fontana 

Uppercase Print (2020) Mar 3, 6 Directed by Radu Jude 

Great Freedom (2021) Mar 17, 20   Directed by Sebastian Meise 

Neighbours (2021) Mar 31, Apr 1  Directed by Mano Khalil 

Pebbles (2021) Apr 16, 17 Directed by P.S. Vinothraj 

Restorations and Rediscoveries  

Cornell Cinema presents a semester-long series of recent digital and analog restorations, beginning with virtual  screenings of three titles, screening on-demand from January 26 to February 6: Federico Fellini’s La Strada, Hou Hsiao hsien’s Flowers of Shanghai, and documentarian James Blue’s sole narrative feature, The Olive Trees of Justice. Cornell  Cinema’s former director, Richard Herskowitz, will provide a pre-recorded introduction to the virtual screening of The  Olive Trees of Justice. Herskowitz has been involved with the James Blue Project for the last ten years, devoted to  preserving the work of the acclaimed but lesser known American documentarian, and was involved with the film’s  restoration. He will discuss the restoration as well as how James Blue came to make the film in Algiers during the  Algerian War. 

In most all cases in this series, “restoration” means going back to original film elements, scanning them, and digitally  repairing the image by removing scratches and tears, dust/dirt, and color correcting for modern digital projection.  Thanks to the tireless work by many film archivists and ambitious distributors, one can  

now look back at the past century-plus of film history and begin to shake up the established canon, and that’s partly  what has been assembled here.  

Accepted masters of the form Federico Fellini (La Strada, The White Sheik, Nights of Cabiria) and Alain Renais (Early  Shorts of Alain Resnais & Je t’aime, je t’aime) are presented alongside radical experimenters Melvin Van Peebles (The  Story of a Three Day Pass), Lizzie Borden (Working Girls), and Toshio Matsumoto (Funeral Parade of Roses). Lynne  Ramsay’s stunning debut feature Ratcatcher, Luis Buñuel’s rediscovered Mexican film The Criminal Life of Archibaldo 

de la Cruz, and the suppressed masterwork of Iranian cinema Chess of the Wind round out the series. Resnais’ Je t’aime,  je t’aime will be shown in a restored 35mm film print! 

The Olive Trees of Justice (1962) Jan 26 – Feb 6 

Directed by James Blue 

w/pre-recorded intro by Richard Herskowitz  

Screening via Cornell Cinema’s Virtual Cinema 

La Strada (1954) Jan 26 – Feb 6  

Directed by Federico Fellini 

Screening via Cornell Cinema’s Virtual Cinema 

Flowers of Shanghai (1998) Jan 26 – Feb 6 

Directed by Hou Hsiao-hsien 

Screening via Cornell Cinema’s Virtual Cinema 

The White Sheik (1952) Feb 7 

Directed by Federico Fellini 

Early Shorts by Alain Resnais (1948-1956) Feb 9 

Directed by Alain Resnais 

Je t’aime, je t’aime (1968) Feb 9  

Directed by Alain Resnais 

Ratcatcher (2000) Feb 15 

Directed by Lynne Ramsay 

The Story of a Three Day Pass (1967) Feb 16 

Directed by Melvin Van Peebles 

Nights of Cabiria (1957) Mar 4, 5 Directed by Federico Fellini 

Funeral Parade of Roses (1969) Mar 10, 11 Directed by Toshio Matsumoto 

Chess of the Wind (1976) Mar 25, 27 

Directed by Mohammad Reza Aslani 

The Criminal Life of Archibaldo de la Cruz (1955) Mar 31, Apr 1 Directed by Luis Buñuel 

Working Girls (1987) Apr 14, 17 Directed by Lizzie Borden 

Women’s Bodies/Women’s Lives  

From Simone Biles’s courageous refusal to risk her mental health to Afghan women being denied their education by  the Taliban, to Texas and Mississippi putting Roe v Wade on the chopping block in a new Supreme Court, men across  the globe continue to assert control over women’s bodies. We offer an international slate of six films—from Chad,  France, Tamil Nadu in southern India, New Zealand and the U.S.—including three stunning debuts by new filmmakers— that challenge patriarchal structures, while celebrating acts of resistance and affirming women’s lives. A mother and  daughter (impregnated from a rape) seek an abortion in Chad (Lingui, the Sacred Bonds); an elite teenage athlete is  groomed by her ‘tough’ coach (Slalom); an abusive husband & father forces his son on a sun-parched journey to retrieve  his wife who left him (Pebbles); a young interracial couple find their bonds stretched when the woman endures a sexual  assault (Test Pattern). Test Pattern has been nominated for Independent Spirit Awards for Best First Feature, Best 

First Screenplay and Best Female Lead (Brittany S. Hall), and we’ll be joined by the film’s writer & director, Shatara  Michelle Ford, for a Q & A via Zoom following the screening.To round out the series we offer a 35mm screening of Jane  Campion’s (The Power of the Dog) glorious 1993 Cannes and Oscar winner The Piano and a new 4K restoration of Lizzie  Borden’s 1987 trail-blazing film of sex workers, Working Girls. 

Cosponsored with the Feminist, Gender & Sexuality Studies Program 

Lingui, the Sacred Bonds (2021) Feb 17, 20 

Directed by Mahamat-Saleh Haroun 

Slalom (2020) Feb 23, 25  Directed by Charlene Favier 

Test Pattern (2021) Mar 9 

w/Zoom Q & A with filmmaker Shatara Michelle Ford 

Working Girls (1987) Apr 14, 17 Directed by Lizzie Borden 

Pebbles (2021) Apr 16, 17 Directed by P.S. Vinothraj 

The Piano (1993) Apr 28  

Directed by Jane Campion 

Doc Spots  

The documentary genre is an ever expanding phenomenon that now incorporates elements of so many other genres  and practices that one would be hard pressed to offer a concise definition of the form. There’s the live documentary,  the hybrid doc/fiction, the animated doc, the experimental doc, and on and on. It’s a horn of plenty, a widely creative  range of so-called non-fiction work that we are always thrilled to tap into for our schedule. This Spring’s selection of  work begins with a program of short films by French New Wave master Alain Resnais, known primarily for his feature  films, including Hiroshima, Mon Amour and Last Year at Marienbad. In these early short documentaries, all recently  restored, he pays homage to the National Library of France, and explores the work of three artists: Picasso, Gauguin,  and Van Gogh. Contemporary filmmaker Bill Morrison, who last thrilled us with Dawson City: Frozen Time, has been  called a film archaeologist, as he typically works with decaying archival footage to reveal fascinating histories. For The  Village Detective, he uses four reels of 35mm film of Soviet provenance found by a fishing boat off the coast of Iceland as a jumping off point for his latest meditation on cinema’s past, offering a journey into Soviet history and film,  accompanied by a gorgeous score by composer David Lang. 

Other highlights of the series include Ethiopian-Mexican filmmaker Jessica Beshir’s Faya Dayi, a visually ravishing film  about the growth and harvesting of the khat plant in Ethiopia. Faya Dayi is one of the most acclaimed and nominated  non-fiction films of 2021, and we’ll be offering a pre-recorded Q & A with Beshir with the screening. It’s one of fifteen  films shortlisted for Best Documentary Feature Oscar, as is Flee, a stunning animated doc that recounts the story of a  teenage Afghan refugee. Film critic Peter Travers writes that the film is “out to stretch the boundaries of filmmaking by  combining graphic artistry with documentary realism to create a cinema experience like no other.” Winner of the Grand  Jury Prize at Sundance in 2021, the film is also shortlisted for Best International Feature Oscar. For other docs pushing  boundaries, check out the documentaries screening as part of our Experimental Landscapes series! 

Early Shorts by Alain Resnais (1948-1956) Feb 9 

Directed by Alain Resnais 

Satoshi Kon: The Illusionist (2021) Feb 11  

Directed by Pascal-Alex Vincent 

The Village Detective (2021) Feb 22, 27 Directed by Bill Morrison 

(X)-trACTION (2021) Mar 7 

w/filmmakers Cathy Lee Crane & Jason Livingston ’94 in person 

Little Girl (2020) Mar 10 

Directed by Sebastien Lifshitz 

Oscar Shorts: Documentary (2021) Mar 13 

Directed by various 

Faya Dayi (2021) Mar 16 

w/pre-recorded Q & A with filmmaker Jessica Beshir 

Flee (2021) Apr 21, 22 Directed by Jonas Poher Rasmussen  

Japanese Cinema Survey  

Screening in conjunction with Introduction to Japanese Film, taught by Andrew Campana (Asian Studies), this short  survey of Japanese cinema contextualizes the production and themes of Japanese film and explores the connections  between film and other media in modern and contemporary Japan. Featuring introductions by Assistant Professor  Andrew Campana on Thursday nights, the series includes experimental troublemaker Toshio Matsumoto (Funeral  Parade of Roses), cult animator Satoshi Kon (Millennium Actress), and Studio Ghibli’s fantastical Spirited Away.  Additionally, Cornell Cinema presents the Ithaca premiere of Ryûsuke Hamaguchi’s (Drive My Car) acclaimed new film  Wheel of Fortune and Fantasy as part of our Virtual Cinema offerings, starting on January 26. For yet more Japanese  film, Cornell Cinema is hosting a deeper dive into Satoshi Kon with the series Satoshi Kon: The Illusionist, featuring three  of his daring animated features and a new documentary about the filmmaker.  

Millennium Actress (2001) Feb 17 

Directed by Satoshi Kon 

Funeral Parade of Roses (1969) Mar 10, 11 Directed by Toshio Matsumoto 

Spirited Away (2002) Mar 24, 26, 27 Directed by Hayao Miyazaki 

Silent Film & Live Music  

Special pricing: $12 general/$10 students ($2 off for All-Access Pass holders) 

If you’ve never seen a silent film or are already a fan of the genre, we’ve got you covered with these two very special  events! There’s no doubt that the best way to experience a classic silent film is with live music, and that experience  expands exponentially when you’ve got some of the best silent film composers and musicians in the world – yes, the  world – writing and performing that music. Cue the Anvil Orchestra, who will perform with a 35mm film print of 

Underworld (1927), the film that launched the career of director Josef von Sternberg as well as the gangster film genre.  The Anvil Orchestra consists of Roger C. Miller (keyboards) and Terry Donahue (accordion, saw & more) of the widely  popular Alloy Orchestra, that performed regularly at Cornell Cinema over the course of 20 years (1999 – 2019).  

Less than a week later, we’ll welcome back world-renowned klezmer violinist Alicia Svigals and celebrated silent film  pianist Donald Sosin (last here in the Fall of 2018 with The Ancient Law (1923)) who will perform their original score for  the satire The City Without Jews (1924), recently restored by Filmarchiv Austria. The film is based on the controversial  1922 novel by Hugo Bettauer about a Viennese-type city named Utopia that expels its Jews to solve its financial  problems, only to experience rapid economic and cultural decline. Though darkly comedic in tone, and stylistically  influenced by German Expressionism, the film nonetheless contains ominous and eerily realistic sequences, such as the  shots of freight trains transporting Jews out of the city. Alicia Svigals’s & Donald Sosin’s performance is made possible  by the Sunrise Foundation for Education and the Arts. Additional support provided by the Jewish Studies Program. Both  events are cosponsored with the Cornell Council for the Arts and the Wharton Studio Museum. 

Underworld (1927) Mar 18 

Directed by Joseph von Sternberg 

w/live music by the Anvil Orchestra 

The City Without Jews (1924) Mar 24 

Directed by H.K. Breslauer 

w/live music by klezmer violinist Alicia Svigals and silent film pianist Donald Sosin 

Oscar Nominated Shorts 

For the 17th consecutive year, Shorts HD and Magnolia Pictures present the Oscar-Nominated Short Films. With all three  categories offered—Animated, Live Action and Documentary—this is your annual chance to predict the winners (and  have the edge in your Oscar pool)! A perennial hit with audiences around the country and the world, don’t miss this  year’s selection of shorts. The Academy Awards take place Sunday, March 27. We’ll post the list of nominees shortly  after they’re announced on February 8.  

Oscar Shorts: Animation (2021) Mar 3, 4, 5 Oscar Shorts: Live Action (2021) Mar 5, 6 

Oscar Shorts: Documentary (2021) Mar 13 

Presented in Part I & II (start time of Part II will be determined after nominees are announced) 

Weekend Favorites  

Featuring many Oscar contenders  

In addition to all the other films Cornell Cinema offers, you can count on the organization to provide a recent Hollywood  hit or other popular title every weekend during the school year. This Spring’s schedule features a number of recent and  critically acclaimed hits that are among the top contenders for Oscar nominations, including for Best Picture of 2021.  Even if you’ve already seen some of these films, it’s entirely different to experience them surrounded by your college  friends, on Cornell Cinema’s large screen, with top-notch projection & sound. Repeat viewings are easy on your budget  too, especially with Cornell Cinema’s All-Access Pass, so there’s no reason to sit at home when big screen fun awaits.  See you this weekend, and every weekend, at Cornell Cinema! 

The line-up includes the recent Marvel hit Shang-Chi and the Legend of the Ten Rings and Jordan Peele’s Us from 2019,  both offered for free courtesy of the Welcome Weekend Committee on February 24, open to CU students only. And for  Valentine’s Day Weekend, check out a free show of Love Don’t Cost a Thing (2003) – not confirmed at press time – sponsored by the Mu Gamma Chapter of the Delta Sigma Theta Sorority. 

The French Dispatch (2021) Feb 11, 12, 13 

Directed by Wes Anderson 

Love Don’t Cost a Thing (2003) not confirmed at press time – FREE Feb 12 

Directed by Troy Byer 

Dune (2021) Feb 18, 19 Directed by Denis Villeneuve 

The Power of the Dog (2021) Feb 18, 20 Directed by Jane Campion 

Don’t Look Up (2021) Feb 22 

Directed by Adam McKay 

Shang-Chi and the Legend of the Ten Rings (2021) FREE Feb 24  

Directed by Destin Daniel Cretton 

Us (2019) FREE Feb 24 

Directed by Jordan Peele 

Encanto (2021) Feb 26, 27 Directed by Jared Bush, Byron Howard 

House of Gucci (2021) Mar 11, 12 Directed by Ridley Scott 

Nightmare Alley (2021) Mar 18, 20 Directed by Guillermo del Torro 

The Tragedy of Macbeth (2021) Mar 25, 26 Directed by Joel Coen 

Licorice Pizza (2021) Apr 15, 16

Directed by Paul Thomas Anderson 

West Side Story (2021) Apr 21, 24 Directed by Steven Spielberg 

Spider-Man: No Way Home (2021) Apr 22, 23 Directed by Jon Watts

Zoë Freer-Hessler

Zoë Freer-Hessler is a general assignment reporter for the Ithaca Voice. She has covered a wide range of topics since joining the news organization in November 2021. She can be reached at zhessler@ithacavoice.com...