ITHACA, N.Y. — The City of Ithaca has lifted the Level 1: Limit Water Use Advisory that it had issued on Sept. 22.

“Rainfall over the past few weeks increased the flow in Six Mile Creek, the City’s water source, to near average levels for this time of year,” reads a Swift 911 alert from the city.

Staff will continue to monitor water levels and could issue restrictions in the future, according to the alert.

Those interested can monitor Six Mile Creek water levels here.

Featured photo courtesy of Brian Maley. Follow @maleyphotog on Instagram.

Earlier — Sept. 22, 2020

ITHACA, N.Y. — The City of Ithaca issued a Limited Water Use Advisory on Wednesday, asking residents to conserve water as the city monitors moderate drought conditions due to limited rainfall.

“With no rainfall forecast for the next 7-days, the City of Ithaca is issuing a Level 1: Limited Water Use Advisory to encourage water conservation,” reads a Swift911 alert from the city. “Until further notice, the City of Ithaca strongly encourages all residents to conserve water.”

Water flow has been decreasing over the past two months in Six Mile Creek, the City’s water source, according to the alert. Typical flows in Six Mile Creek for this time of year are 10 to 15 cubic feet per second (CFS). The current flow is approximately 5 CFS. A flow rate below 4 CFS is considered critical as the City will begin to draw more water than the creek can supply and would result in a lowering of the reservoir level.

Officials say that health and safety are still a priority and that residents should continue washing your hands with soap and water for 20 seconds to help prevent the spread of COVID-19.

Households should take the following steps to conserve water:

  • Limit water use to essential needs only.
  • Wait until you have a full load before running washing machines or dishwashers.
  • Do not leave water running while washing dishes, brushing your teeth or shaving.
  • Find and repair leaks in your home or business including running toilets and leaking faucets. A single slow drip can waste up to 10 gallons per day.

Monitor Six Mile Creek water levels here.