Ithaca, N.Y. — Downtown Ithaca is welcoming two new businesses, according to an announcement made Thursday.

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A third, the Art and Found, also said Thursday that it will be opening on North Cayuga Street after leaving its location on the Commons.

What are the new businesses?

In early March, there will be ribbon cutting ceremonies for Bramble and Taitem Engineering.

1 — Bramble, which sells bulk herbs and spices, medicinal supplies, and locally handcrafted products, will operate out of Press Bay Alley at 118 West Green Street.

The collectively owned and operated store also offers “herbal health consultations, a lending library and special classes and events,” according to a news release from the Downtown Ithaca Alliance.

“We believe that a healthy community requires access to sustainable local healthcare. We chose to be in downtown Ithaca in order to be more accessible to all members of the area and to be a part of the thriving network of downtown businesses,” co-founder Amanda David said in a news release.

A photo from Bramble’s Facebook page

2 — Taitem Engineering, in business since 1989, has moved  to 109 South Albany Street.

The company does consulting for engineering, commissioning, LEED, energy modeling, sustainability, and energy studies, according to a news release. It also does specialty contracting like solar panel installation and Aeroseal duct sealing.

“Their new downtown office building was acquired to accommodate a growing solar design and duct sealing crew,” a news release says.

Founder Ian Shapiro said in a news release that the company was excited to be able to walk to work.

“We have grown steadily over the past two years and we’re looking forward to continued growth that supports our local economy, reduces greenhouse gases, and provides a positive work environment,” Shapiro said in a news release.

A ribbon cutting ceremony for Taitem Engineering will be held in early March as well.

Art and Found moves

The Art and Found is moving to 112 North Cayuga Street, between SewGreen and the Bandwagon Brewpub, according to a statement released by the business today.

The store is owned by Olivia Royale and sells sustainable clothing, fair trade and locally made products, and vintage fashions.

SewGreen collects and sells fabric, yarn and sewing supplies, according to a news release. It will be connected to the Art and Found through an inside walkway.

The fate of Art and Found was unclear after The Voice reported in December that Royale would be leaving her Commons location.

Royale, owner of Art and Found. (Provided pic.)

Now, however, it’s clear that the store is around to stay.

The press release from the Art and Found continues:

“This collaboration is very forward-thinking,” says SewGreen director Wendy Skinner. “It teams a for-profit with a not-for-profit business in pursuit of common goals. We can share space, ideas, and our customer base in a creative atmosphere. The Art and Found’s unique, sustainable and locally made wares are a perfect complement to SewGreen’s reuse and sewing programs.”

Royale plans to focus primarily on the design, production and sales of her own independent clothing label, with garments produced on site by a team of seamstresses and local students. In addition, the Art and Found and SewGreen will host workshops, arts events, and seminars.

The Art and Found will still carry popular brands from the previous location, and each month the store will host a trunk show that offers customers something new.

“I’m excited about this next phase of business that promotes fashion sustainability and local vendors,” says Royale. “I invite everyone to follow us to our new home, which we feel it is more appropriate for our mission. We’re going to have a lot of fun, and we’re happy to be away from the construction on the Commons.

The Art and Found will open for business on March 1.


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Jeff Stein

Jeff Stein is the founder and former editor of the Ithaca Voice.