This opinion column was written by Brian Crandall, who runs the blog Ithacating in Cornell Heights.

Developer Jason Fane has proposed a Collegetown building that would be twice the current legal limit.

Ithaca, N.Y. — Let’s be clear: this will not happen.

What Jason Fane was thinking in proposing a 12-story building for the Green Cafe site has everything to do with seeing what he can get away with. The calculating businessman as always, shocking the board and meeting attendees with a massive proposal … my only guess is that he is willing to negotiate down. The likely goal is to end up with something still above the 80′ 6-story limit for that site, and apparently the way to do that is shock and awe.

Jason Fane in front of Ithaca’s planning and development board Tuesday night. (Jeff Stein/IthacaVoice)
Jason Fane in front of Ithaca’s planning and development board Tuesday night. (Jeff Stein/IthacaVoice)
The current site of the proposed development.

A copy of sketch plan can be found here. Mostly site photos, but we can see the first floor layout (6,000 sq ft in three retail units, and some apartment space; the building also shares a rear corridor with Fane’s Collegetown Center next door) and a render from the angle of the third floor of the Ciaschi Block, but set too far back from the street to actually exist.

I mean, just look at it. It overwhelms the large 312 College and Collegetown Center buildings next to it. This thing is a goddamned behemoth of a building, as Ithaca standards go. It’s a lovely design, I think: I’d love to see this downtown on the old Tetra Tech/Rothschild’s property. Of course, that’s like saying a Mercedes SLS is the car you’d like to buy, but you make only 30K/yr. It’s not reasonable.

For the record, the never-to-be-built design is by Fane’s preferred architect, Jagat Sharma of local firm Sharma Architecture. The current site is that of the vacant Green Cafe, and before that short stint as a restaurant in 2009/2010, the one-story structure was used for meetings and storage by Bank of America.

Built in 1998 and occupying 0.97 acres (including the apartment building attached), it has an assessed land value of $2.5 million, as it sits on what is probably the most expensive corner in the city. Everyone expected a redevelopment, just not this large.

I can hardly believe I’m even writing about this. It’s so spectacularly overboard that it defies all common sense and logic.

Jeff Stein

Jeff Stein is the founder and former editor of the Ithaca Voice.